Nourishing Tradition

JEWISH COOKBOOKS & THE STORIES THEY TELL

Introduction

Food & Community

Food as Memory

Homemakers & Restaurateurs

Introduction

Food & Community

Food as Memory

Homemakers & Restaurateurs

Tempting Kosher Dishes: prepared from World Famous Manischewitz’s Matzo Products

F.O. Gahr; B. Manischewitz Co.

Cincinnati  B. Manischewitz Co., 1930

American Jewish Historical Society

Phyllis Wolff; The Birkett Mills

Penn Yan, N.Y.: The Birkett Mills, 1946

Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

Tempting Kosher Dishes: Prepared from World Famous Manischewitz’s Matzo Products

Manischewitz, founded in 1888, is the most popular and well-known kosher brand in the United States. This book, published in 1930, retailed for $1.50, and was printed in Yiddish and English. It features both sweet and savory recipes that can be made with their signature Matzo products, and also includes a color spread proudly advertising all the products as well as their expanding factory facilities.

Explore the recipes here.

Wolff’s Cook Book: Tempting Dishes Prepared from World-Famous Wolff’s Buckwheat Products

Wolff’s products, produced in Birkett’s Mills, NY, have been in business since the 19th century. Widely known for their kasha (a grainlike product made primarily from buckwheat), their products have been staples of Jewish households in America for over 100 years. This cookbook, produced in 1946, is a promotional item created to showcase different recipes beyond their well-loved kasha.

F.O. Gahr; B. Manischewitz Co.

Cincinnati: B. Manischewitz Co., 1930

TX724 .M3 1930

American Jewish Historical Society

Page 78 features an image of Manischewitz “Cincinnati Bakery No. 1, located at 2100 West Eighth Street— largest matzoh bakery in the world.”

Reaching New Consumers

IN THE LATE 19th and early 20th centuries, immigrants from Eastern Europe comprised a large wave of migratory activity. These immigrants, largely Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi Jews from countries such as Russia, Galicia, and Poland, were fleeing from the pogroms sweeping the Eastern European countryside. This new wave of immigrants were conservative in their religious practice, in contrast to the more Reform-minded German-speaking Jews who had immigrated in mid-19th century. This explosion of Orthodox, Yiddish speaking Jews in America also created the realization by corporations that this was potentially a growth market for consumer goods.

 

Manufacturers then created cookbooks and ephemera specifically designed to sell kosher products, including traditional brands like Manischewitz, but also widely used products like Crisco. Crisco was the first shortening to be 100% made of vegetable oil, making it kosher, but Proctor & Gamble (the manufacturers of Crisco) also engaged in a widespread marketing campaign of cookbook giveaways, including this one in English and Yiddish.

Reaching New Consumers

IN THE LATE 19th and early 20th centuries, immigrants from Eastern Europe comprised a large wave of migratory activity. These immigrants, largely Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi Jews from countries such as Russia, Galicia, and Poland, were fleeing from the pogroms sweeping the Eastern European countryside. This new wave of immigrants were conservative in their religious practice, in contrast to the more Reform-minded German-speaking Jews who had immigrated in mid-19th century. This explosion of Orthodox, Yiddish speaking Jews in America also created the realization by corporations that this was potentially a growth market for consumer goods.

 

Manufacturers then created cookbooks and ephemera specifically designed to sell kosher products, including traditional brands like Manischewitz, but also widely used products like Crisco. Crisco was the first shortening to be 100% made of vegetable oil, making it kosher, but Proctor & Gamble (the manufacturers of Crisco) also engaged in a widespread marketing campaign of cookbook giveaways, including this one in English and Yiddish.

Tempting Kosher Dishes: Prepared from World Famous Manischewitz’s Matzo Products

Tempting Kosher Dishes: prepared from World Famous Manischewitz’s Matzo Products

F.O. Gahr; B. Manischewitz Co.

Cincinnati  B. Manischewitz Co., 1930

American Jewish Historical Society

Page 78 features an image of Manischewitz “Cincinnati Bakery No. 1, located at 2100 West Eighth Street— largest matzoh bakery in the world.”

Manischewitz, founded in 1888, is the most popular and well-known kosher brand in the United States. This book, published in 1930, retailed for $1.50, and was printed in Yiddish and English. It features both sweet and savory recipes that can be made with their signature Matzo products, and also includes a color spread proudly advertising all the products as well as their expanding factory facilities.

Wolff’s Cook Book: Tempting Dishes Prepared from World-Famous Wolff’s Buckwheat Products

Phyllis Wolff; The Birkett Mills

Penn Yan, N.Y.: The Birkett Mills, 1946

Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

Wolff’s products, produced in Birkett’s Mills, NY, have been in business since the 19th century. Widely known for their kasha (a grainlike product made primarily from buckwheat), their products have been staples of Jewish households in America for over 100 years. This cookbook, produced in 1946, is a promotional item created to showcase different recipes beyond their well-loved kasha.

Crisco Recipes For the Jewish Housewife

These cookbooks were created by Proctor & Gamble in 1933 as a promotional item encouraging the sale of Crisco to recent Eastern European émigrés, printed in both Yiddish and English for maximum appeal. The manufacturers put a note in the introduction that the decision to print in both languages was so a Yiddish speaking mother and English speaking daughter could follow along and cook together, without language as a barrier.

Crisco Recipes For the Jewish Housewife

Krisko resepy es far der idisher baleboste

קריסקא רעסעפיעס פאר דער אידישער באלעבאסטע

Procter & Gamble Company

Cincinnati, Ohio: Procter and Gamble, c1933 TX724 .C7 1933

American Jewish Historical Society

Crisco Recipes For the Jewish Housewife

קריסקא רעסעפיעס פאר דער אידישער באלעבאסטע

These cookbooks were created by Proctor & Gamble in 1933 as a promotional item encouraging the sale of Crisco to recent Eastern European émigrés, printed in both Yiddish and English for maximum appeal. The manufacturers put a note in the introduction that the decision to print in both languages was so a Yiddish speaking mother and English speaking daughter could follow along and cook together, without language as a barrier.

Introduction

Food & Community

Food as Memory

Homemakers & Restaurateurs

Introduction

Food & Community

Food as Memory

Homemakers & Restaurateurs

Introduction

Food & Community

Food as Memory

Homemakers & Restaurateurs

Tempting Kosher Dishes: prepared from World Famous Manischewitz’s Matzo Products

F.O. Gahr; B. Manischewitz Co.

Cincinnati  B. Manischewitz Co., 1930

American Jewish Historical Society

Phyllis Wolff; The Birkett Mills

Penn Yan, N.Y.: The Birkett Mills, 1946

Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

Tempting Kosher Dishes: Prepared from World Famous Manischewitz’s Matzo Products

Manischewitz, founded in 1888, is the most popular and well-known kosher brand in the United States. This book, published in 1930, retailed for $1.50, and was printed in Yiddish and English. It features both sweet and savory recipes that can be made with their signature Matzo products, and also includes a color spread proudly advertising all the products as well as their expanding factory facilities.

Explore the recipes here.

Wolff’s Cook Book: Tempting Dishes Prepared from World-Famous Wolff’s Buckwheat Products

Wolff’s products, produced in Birkett’s Mills, NY, have been in business since the 19th century. Widely known for their kasha (a grainlike product made primarily from buckwheat), their products have been staples of Jewish households in America for over 100 years. This cookbook, produced in 1946, is a promotional item created to showcase different recipes beyond their well-loved kasha.

F.O. Gahr; B. Manischewitz Co.

Cincinnati: B. Manischewitz Co., 1930

TX724 .M3 1930

American Jewish Historical Society

Page 78 features an image of Manischewitz “Cincinnati Bakery No. 1, located at 2100 West Eighth Street— largest matzoh bakery in the world.”

Reaching New Consumers

IN THE LATE 19th and early 20th centuries, immigrants from Eastern Europe comprised a large wave of migratory activity. These immigrants, largely Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi Jews from countries such as Russia, Galicia, and Poland, were fleeing from the pogroms sweeping the Eastern European countryside. This new wave of immigrants were conservative in their religious practice, in contrast to the more Reform-minded German-speaking Jews who had immigrated in mid-19th century. This explosion of Orthodox, Yiddish speaking Jews in America also created the realization by corporations that this was potentially a growth market for consumer goods.

 

Manufacturers then created cookbooks and ephemera specifically designed to sell kosher products, including traditional brands like Manischewitz, but also widely used products like Crisco. Crisco was the first shortening to be 100% made of vegetable oil, making it kosher, but Proctor & Gamble (the manufacturers of Crisco) also engaged in a widespread marketing campaign of cookbook giveaways, including this one in English and Yiddish.

Reaching New Consumers

IN THE LATE 19th and early 20th centuries, immigrants from Eastern Europe comprised a large wave of migratory activity. These immigrants, largely Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi Jews from countries such as Russia, Galicia, and Poland, were fleeing from the pogroms sweeping the Eastern European countryside. This new wave of immigrants were conservative in their religious practice, in contrast to the more Reform-minded German-speaking Jews who had immigrated in mid-19th century. This explosion of Orthodox, Yiddish speaking Jews in America also created the realization by corporations that this was potentially a growth market for consumer goods.

 

Manufacturers then created cookbooks and ephemera specifically designed to sell kosher products, including traditional brands like Manischewitz, but also widely used products like Crisco. Crisco was the first shortening to be 100% made of vegetable oil, making it kosher, but Proctor & Gamble (the manufacturers of Crisco) also engaged in a widespread marketing campaign of cookbook giveaways, including this one in English and Yiddish.

Tempting Kosher Dishes: Prepared from World Famous Manischewitz’s Matzo Products

Tempting Kosher Dishes: prepared from World Famous Manischewitz’s Matzo Products

F.O. Gahr; B. Manischewitz Co.

Cincinnati  B. Manischewitz Co., 1930

American Jewish Historical Society

Page 78 features an image of Manischewitz “Cincinnati Bakery No. 1, located at 2100 West Eighth Street— largest matzoh bakery in the world.”

Manischewitz, founded in 1888, is the most popular and well-known kosher brand in the United States. This book, published in 1930, retailed for $1.50, and was printed in Yiddish and English. It features both sweet and savory recipes that can be made with their signature Matzo products, and also includes a color spread proudly advertising all the products as well as their expanding factory facilities.

Wolff’s Cook Book: Tempting Dishes Prepared from World-Famous Wolff’s Buckwheat Products

Phyllis Wolff; The Birkett Mills

Penn Yan, N.Y.: The Birkett Mills, 1946

Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

Wolff’s products, produced in Birkett’s Mills, NY, have been in business since the 19th century. Widely known for their kasha (a grainlike product made primarily from buckwheat), their products have been staples of Jewish households in America for over 100 years. This cookbook, produced in 1946, is a promotional item created to showcase different recipes beyond their well-loved kasha.

Crisco Recipes For the Jewish Housewife

These cookbooks were created by Proctor & Gamble in 1933 as a promotional item encouraging the sale of Crisco to recent Eastern European émigrés, printed in both Yiddish and English for maximum appeal. The manufacturers put a note in the introduction that the decision to print in both languages was so a Yiddish speaking mother and English speaking daughter could follow along and cook together, without language as a barrier.

Crisco Recipes For the Jewish Housewife

Krisko resepy es far der idisher baleboste

קריסקא רעסעפיעס פאר דער אידישער באלעבאסטע

Procter & Gamble Company

Cincinnati, Ohio: Procter and Gamble, c1933 TX724 .C7 1933

American Jewish Historical Society

Crisco Recipes For the Jewish Housewife

קריסקא רעסעפיעס פאר דער אידישער באלעבאסטע

These cookbooks were created by Proctor & Gamble in 1933 as a promotional item encouraging the sale of Crisco to recent Eastern European émigrés, printed in both Yiddish and English for maximum appeal. The manufacturers put a note in the introduction that the decision to print in both languages was so a Yiddish speaking mother and English speaking daughter could follow along and cook together, without language as a barrier.

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