Nourishing Tradition

JEWISH COOKBOOKS & THE STORIES THEY TELL

Introduction

Reaching New Consumers

Food as Memory

Homemakers & Restaurateurs

The Sephardic Cooks

Emily Amato; Blanchette Ichay; Congregation Or VeShalom Sisterhood

Atlanta, GA. : Congregation Or VeShalom, 1977

Collection of American Sephardi Federation

Food & Community

AS JEWS HAVE moved across the globe, the communities they establish have given rise to an ever-expanding diversity of Jewish cuisine. Jewish culinary traditions, shaped by Shabbat and holiday observances as well as the laws of kashrut, help tie a community to its religious and cultural origins. The cookbooks here represent the myriad ways that Jewish cooks have held on to those traditions, while adapting them to the kitchens and markets of their new homes; one example of this ingenuity is the recipe for “Papas Rellenas, or Gefilte Malaiklaj Peruvian Style,” from A Russian Jew Cooks in Peru.

 

From that Ashkenazi community in Peru to a Sephardic synagogue in Atlanta, Georgia, the recipes shared here represent the versatility and persistence of Jewish foodways around the world. These cookbooks document the food cultures of communities with long histories, such as the Jews of Izmir, and of those established in the more recent past, such as the Russian Jews of Peru. In all cases, these books demonstrate a desire to hold on to the traditions, old and new, that bring Jews together as a people.

Deal Delights

Along the northern stretch of the New Jersey shoreline, the borough of Deal, NJ, has since the 1960s become home to a sizable Syrian Sephardic community that may, particularly during the summer months, reach 80% of the total population. This classic cookbook was the first time many of the community’s renowned recipes were printed and is still popular today.

The Sephardic Cooks

Jews have variously called Georgia “home” since 1735. While initially a predominantly Sephardic community, the composition became more Ashkenazi over the course of the 20th century. Members of Congregation Or VeShalom, founded in 1914, created this cookbook in the 1970s to help Atlanta’s Sephardic community retain the traditional Spanish-Jewish dishes of their ancestors.

Emily Amato; Blanchette Ichay; Congregation Or VeShalom Sisterhood

Atlanta, GA.: Congregation Or VeShalom, 1977

TX724 .S45 1977

Collection of American Sephardi Federation

Kaybolan ve Yasayan 100 Yemek Tarifiyle Izmir Sefarad Mutfagı

This cookbook is dedicated to the cuisine of the Jews of Izmir, Turkey. Dating to antiquity, the composition of the Jewish community has changed over time as waves of immigrants (including from Portugal, Greece, Holland, and Italy) sought refuge and/or opportunities in this seaport city. Izmir once boasted over 30 Sephardic synagogues, eight of which remain today.

Ester Antebi

Istanbul: E. Antebi, 2005

TX724 .K39 2005

Collection of American Sephardi Federation

A Russian Jew Cooks in Peru

From the late 19th to the early 20th century, over two million Jews fled Russia to escape persecution and poverty. Many emigrated to Europe and the United States, but a significant number also established communities in South America, with many Russian Jews coming to Peru in the 1920s and 1930s. This cookbook shows the influence of Peruvian cuisine on the foodways of the Jews that settled there.

Explore the recipes here.

Violeta Autumn

San Francisco: 101 Productions;

[distributed by Scribner, New York], 1973 TX716.P4 A9

American Jewish Historical Society

Poopa Dweck; Deal Synagogue Sisterhood

Deal, N.J.: Sephardic Women’s Organization of the Jersey Shore, 1980 TX724 .D42 1980

Collection of American Sephardi Federation

Deal Delights

Along the northern stretch of the New Jersey shoreline, the borough of Deal, NJ, has since the 1960s become home to a sizable Syrian Sephardic community that may, particularly during the summer months, reach 80% of the total population. This classic cookbook was the first time many of the community’s renowned recipes were printed and is still popular today.

Poopa Dweck; Deal Synagogue Sisterhood

Deal, N.J.: Sephardic Women’s Organization of the Jersey Shore, 1980 TX724 .D42 1980

Collection of American Sephardi Federation

Kaybolan ve Yasayan 100 Yemek Tarifiyle Izmir Sefarad Mutfagı

This cookbook is dedicated to the cuisine of the Jews of Izmir, Turkey. Dating to antiquity, the composition of the Jewish community has changed over time as waves of immigrants (including from Portugal, Greece, Holland, and Italy) sought refuge and/or opportunities in this seaport city. Izmir once boasted over 30 Sephardic synagogues, eight of which remain today.

Ester Antebi

Istanbul: E. Antebi, 2005

TX724 .K39 2005

Collection of American Sephardi Federation

The Sephardic Cooks

Jews have variously called Georgia “home” since 1735. While initially a predominantly Sephardic community, the composition became more Ashkenazi over the course of the 20th century. Members of Congregation Or VeShalom, founded in 1914, created this cookbook in the 1970s to help Atlanta’s Sephardic community retain the traditional Spanish-Jewish dishes of their ancestors.

Emily Amato; Blanchette Ichay; Congregation Or VeShalom Sisterhood

Atlanta, GA.: Congregation Or VeShalom, 1977

TX724 .S45 1977

Collection of American Sephardi Federation

Introduction

Reaching New Consumers

Food as Memory

Homemakers & Restaurateurs

The Sephardic Cooks

Emily Amato; Blanchette Ichay; Congregation Or VeShalom Sisterhood

Atlanta, GA. : Congregation Or VeShalom, 1977

Collection of American Sephardi Federation

Food & Community

AS JEWS HAVE moved across the globe, the communities they establish have given rise to an ever-expanding diversity of Jewish cuisine. Jewish culinary traditions, shaped by Shabbat and holiday observances as well as the laws of kashrut, help tie a community to its religious and cultural origins. The cookbooks here represent the myriad ways that Jewish cooks have held on to those traditions, while adapting them to the kitchens and markets of their new homes; one example of this ingenuity is the recipe for “Papas Rellenas, or Gefilte Malaiklaj Peruvian Style,” from A Russian Jew Cooks in Peru.

 

From that Ashkenazi community in Peru to a Sephardic synagogue in Atlanta, Georgia, the recipes shared here represent the versatility and persistence of Jewish foodways around the world. These cookbooks document the food cultures of communities with long histories, such as the Jews of Izmir, and of those established in the more recent past, such as the Russian Jews of Peru. In all cases, these books demonstrate a desire to hold on to the traditions, old and new, that bring Jews together as a people.

A Russian Jew Cooks in Peru

From the late 19th to the early 20th century, over two million Jews fled Russia to escape persecution and poverty. Many emigrated to Europe and the United States, but a significant number also established communities in South America, with many Russian Jews coming to Peru in the 1920s and 1930s. This cookbook shows the influence of Peruvian cuisine on the foodways of the Jews that settled there.

Violeta Autumn

San Francisco: 101 Productions;

[distributed by Scribner, New York], 1973 TX716.P4 A9

American Jewish Historical Society

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