Nourishing Tradition

JEWISH COOKBOOKS & THE STORIES THEY TELL

Vollstaendiges Praktisches Kochbuch fuer die Juedische Kueche

Bertha Gumprich’s Vollstaendiges Praktisches Kochbuch fuer die Juedische Kueche (Full Practical Cookbook for Jewish Cuisine) is an early example of a household manual in the vein of Esther Levy’s Jewish Cookery Book, but with an even stronger focus on cooking. Here, Mrs. Gumprich dispenses invaluable advice for the affluent German-Jewish housewife on food preparation and service.

Vollstaendiges Praktisches Kochbuch fuer die Juedische Kueche 
Bertha (Meyer) Gumprich
Trier: Im Selbstverlage der Verfasserin, 1888; r 260
From the Library of the Leo Baeck Institute

Introduction

Reaching New Consumers

Food & Community

Food as Memory

Homemakers & Restaurateurs

THE INCREASED INTEREST in and availability of the cookbook exploded in the 19th century, with the Victorian ideals of domestic tranquility and cult of true womanhood taking root in popular culture. Starting with Eliza Acton’s famous Modern Cookery for Private Families in 1845, and continuing on to great success with Mrs. Beeton’s immensely popular Book of Household Management in 1861, books on cookery aimed at a domestic (not a professional) audience became best-sellers. Jewish women were not immune to this trend; they also wanted books on cooking and domestic economy, books that took into account the demands of a kosher household.

In 1871, Mrs. Esther Levy wrote the first book of Jewish cookery to be published in the United States, printed in Philadelphia by W.S. Turner. In Germany, Rebecca Wolf published a similar text in 1851, as did Bertha Gumprich in 1888; all of these replicated the concept of domestic economy, but for a Jewish (and kosher) household. In 1938, Fania Lewando elevated this to a new level with her beautifully illustrated book of kosher vegetarian cooking, V .eget. arish-diet .isher kokhbukh (400 shpayzn gemakht oysshlishlekh fun grinsn), which embraced a new trend in cooking and cookery, dietary science and the importance of healthy eating. Lewando wrote her cookbook from a new perspective— that of a successful restaurateur, who collected recipes from her bustling Vilna restaurant into this stunning and unusual volume.

Vegetarish-Dietisher Kokhbukh: (400 shpayzn gemakht oysshlishlekh fun grinsn)

This unusual cookbook was written by Fania Lewando, the owner and proprietor of a successful vegetarian restaurant in pre-war Vilna, Lithuania. The lush, colorful illustrations reflect Lewando’s credo: that vegetarian cooking is not a sacrifice, but a choice to eat more heathfully and ethically. The recipes here include meatless versions of Jewish classics, and more unusual dishes served in her restaurant.

Jewish Cookery Book, on Principles of Economy: Adapted for Jewish Housekeepers...

The first Jewish cookbook to be published in the United States, Esther Levy’s Jewish Cookery Book contains not only recipes, but also thorough instructions on the proper maintenance of a 19th century Jewish-American household. Mrs. Levy’s book spoke to an educated, affluent class of American Jews who wished to show their prosperity while maintaining Jewish traditions.

Esther Levy, 1871

This edition: Cambridge, Mass. : Applewood Books ; Chester, CTt

Distributed by Globe Pequot Press, 1988

TX724 .L98

American Jewish Historical Society

Fania Lewando

Vilna: Druk. Inz. . G. Kleckina, 1938

RARE 1938

Collection of YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

Nourishing Tradition: Jewish Cookbooks & the Stories They Tell has been made possible in part by The David Berg Foundation’s creation and support of The David Berg Rare Book Room, a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor, as well as funding from The New York Community Trust's NYC COVID-19 Response and Impact Fund and a Humanities New York CARES Grant with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the federal CARES Act. 

This exhibition was organized by the Center for Jewish History, with participating partners American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. 

Vegetarish-Dietisher Kokhbukh :

(400 shpayzn gemakht oysshlishlekh fun grinsn)

Fania Lewando

Vilna : Druk. Inz. . G. Kleckina, 1938

Collection of YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

Vollstaendiges Praktisches Kochbuch fuer die Juedische Kueche

Bertha Gumprich’s Vollstaendiges Praktisches Kochbuch fuer die Juedische Kueche (Full Practical Cookbook for Jewish Cuisine) is an early example of a household manual in the vein of Esther Levy’s Jewish Cookery Book, but with an even stronger focus on cooking. Here, Mrs. Gumprich dispenses invaluable advice for the affluent German-Jewish housewife on food preparation and service.

Vollstaendiges Praktisches Kochbuch fuer die Juedische Kueche 
Bertha (Meyer) Gumprich
Trier: Im Selbstverlage der Verfasserin, 1888; r 260
From the Library of the Leo Baeck Institute

Fania Lewando

Vilna: Druk. Inz. . G. Kleckina, 1938

RARE 1938

Collection of YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

Vegetarish-Dietisher Kokhbukh: (400 shpayzn gemakht oysshlishlekh fun grinsn)

This unusual cookbook was written by Fania Lewando, the owner and proprietor of a successful vegetarian restaurant in pre-war Vilna, Lithuania. The lush, colorful illustrations reflect Lewando’s credo: that vegetarian cooking is not a sacrifice, but a choice to eat more heathfully and ethically. The recipes here include meatless versions of Jewish classics, and more unusual dishes served in her restaurant.

Introduction

Reaching New Consumers

Food & Community

Food as Memory

Nourishing Tradition: Jewish Cookbooks & the Stories They Tell has been made possible in part by The David Berg Foundation’s creation and support of The David Berg Rare Book Room, a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor, as well as funding from The New York Community Trust's NYC COVID-19 Response and Impact Fund and a Humanities New York CARES Grant with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the federal CARES Act. 

This exhibition was organized by the Center for Jewish History, with participating partners American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. 

Homemakers & Restaurateurs

THE INCREASED INTEREST in and availability of the cookbook exploded in the 19th century, with the Victorian ideals of domestic tranquility and cult of true womanhood taking root in popular culture. Starting with Eliza Acton’s famous Modern Cookery for Private Families in 1845, and continuing on to great success with Mrs. Beeton’s immensely popular Book of Household Management in 1861, books on cookery aimed at a domestic (not a professional) audience became best-sellers. Jewish women were not immune to this trend; they also wanted books on cooking and domestic economy, books that took into account the demands of a kosher household.

 

In 1871, Mrs. Esther Levy wrote the first book of Jewish cookery to be published in the United States, printed in Philadelphia by W.S. Turner. In Germany, Rebecca Wolf published a similar text in 1851, as did Bertha Gumprich in 1888; all of these replicated the concept of domestic economy, but for a Jewish (and kosher) household. In 1938, Fania Lewando elevated this to a new level with her beautifully illustrated book of kosher vegetarian cooking, V .eget. arish-diet .isher kokhbukh (400 shpayzn gemakht oysshlishlekh fun grinsn), which embraced a new trend in cooking and cookery, dietary science and the importance of healthy eating. Lewando wrote her cookbook from a new perspective— that of a successful restaurateur, who collected recipes from her bustling Vilna restaurant into this stunning and unusual volume.

Esther Levy, 1871

This edition: Cambridge, Mass. : Applewood Books ; Chester, CTt

Distributed by Globe Pequot Press, 1988

TX724 .L98

American Jewish Historical Society

Jewish Cookery Book, on Principles of Economy: Adapted for Jewish Housekeepers...

The first Jewish cookbook to be published in the United States, Esther Levy’s Jewish Cookery Book contains not only recipes, but also thorough instructions on the proper maintenance of a 19th century Jewish-American household. Mrs. Levy’s book spoke to an educated, affluent class of American Jews who wished to show their prosperity while maintaining Jewish traditions.

Vollstaendiges Praktisches Kochbuch fuer die Juedische Kueche

Bertha Gumprich’s Vollstaendiges Praktisches Kochbuch fuer die Juedische Kueche (Full Practical Cookbook for Jewish Cuisine) is an early example of a household manual in the vein of Esther Levy’s Jewish Cookery Book, but with an even stronger focus on cooking. Here, Mrs. Gumprich dispenses invaluable advice for the affluent German-Jewish housewife on food preparation and service.

Vollstaendiges Praktisches Kochbuch fuer die Juedische Kueche 
Bertha (Meyer) Gumprich
Trier: Im Selbstverlage der Verfasserin, 1888; r 260
From the Library of the Leo Baeck Institute

Introduction

Reaching New Consumers

Food & Community

Food as Memory

Homemakers & Restaurateurs

THE INCREASED INTEREST in and availability of the cookbook exploded in the 19th century, with the Victorian ideals of domestic tranquility and cult of true womanhood taking root in popular culture. Starting with Eliza Acton’s famous Modern Cookery for Private Families in 1845, and continuing on to great success with Mrs. Beeton’s immensely popular Book of Household Management in 1861, books on cookery aimed at a domestic (not a professional) audience became best-sellers. Jewish women were not immune to this trend; they also wanted books on cooking and domestic economy, books that took into account the demands of a kosher household.

In 1871, Mrs. Esther Levy wrote the first book of Jewish cookery to be published in the United States, printed in Philadelphia by W.S. Turner. In Germany, Rebecca Wolf published a similar text in 1851, as did Bertha Gumprich in 1888; all of these replicated the concept of domestic economy, but for a Jewish (and kosher) household. In 1938, Fania Lewando elevated this to a new level with her beautifully illustrated book of kosher vegetarian cooking, V .eget. arish-diet .isher kokhbukh (400 shpayzn gemakht oysshlishlekh fun grinsn), which embraced a new trend in cooking and cookery, dietary science and the importance of healthy eating. Lewando wrote her cookbook from a new perspective— that of a successful restaurateur, who collected recipes from her bustling Vilna restaurant into this stunning and unusual volume.

Vegetarish-Dietisher Kokhbukh :

(400 shpayzn gemakht oysshlishlekh fun grinsn)

Fania Lewando

Vilna : Druk. Inz. . G. Kleckina, 1938

Collection of YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

Vegetarish-Dietisher Kokhbukh: (400 shpayzn gemakht oysshlishlekh fun grinsn)

This unusual cookbook was written by Fania Lewando, the owner and proprietor of a successful vegetarian restaurant in pre-war Vilna, Lithuania. The lush, colorful illustrations reflect Lewando’s credo: that vegetarian cooking is not a sacrifice, but a choice to eat more heathfully and ethically. The recipes here include meatless versions of Jewish classics, and more unusual dishes served in her restaurant.

Nourishing Tradition: Jewish Cookbooks & the Stories They Tell has been made possible in part by The David Berg Foundation’s creation and support of The David Berg Rare Book Room, a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor, as well as funding from The New York Community Trust's NYC COVID-19 Response and Impact Fund and a Humanities New York CARES Grant with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the federal CARES Act. 

This exhibition was organized by the Center for Jewish History, with participating partners American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. 

Jewish Cookery Book, on Principles of Economy: Adapted for Jewish Housekeepers...

The first Jewish cookbook to be published in the United States, Esther Levy’s Jewish Cookery Book contains not only recipes, but also thorough instructions on the proper maintenance of a 19th century Jewish-American household. Mrs. Levy’s book spoke to an educated, affluent class of American Jews who wished to show their prosperity while maintaining Jewish traditions.

Esther Levy, 1871

This edition: Cambridge, Mass. : Applewood Books ; Chester, CTt

Distributed by Globe Pequot Press, 1988

TX724 .L98

American Jewish Historical Society

Fania Lewando

Vilna: Druk. Inz. . G. Kleckina, 1938

RARE 1938

Collection of YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

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